Water Planning Data for Region N (Coastal Bend)

Aransas River - From the confluence with Copano Bay in Aransas/Refugio County to a point 3.3 miles upstream of Chiltipin Creek in Refugio/San Patricio County (TNRCC classified stream segment 2003).

Biological function - Extensive estuarine wetland habitat (National Wetlands Inventory, 1999)
Threatened or endangered species/unique communities - reddish egret (SOC/St.T), piping plover (Fed.T/St. T), snowy plover (SOC), white-faced ibis (SOC/St.T), wood stork (SOC/St.T), brown pelican (Fed.E/St.E) (TPWD, 2000)

Nueces River - From the Calallan saltwater barrier upstream about 35 miles to Seale Dam at Lake Corpus Christi (TNRCC classified stream segment 2102).

Biological function - Freshwater marsh on the floodplain at the lower portion of this segment (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2000)
Riparian conservation area - City of Corpus Christi Wildlife Sanctuary; Hazel Bazemore County Park.
High water quality/exceptional aquatic life/high aesthetic value - High aesthetic and economic value for outdoor recreation, especially birdwatching. Hazel Bazemore Park is a world-class hawk migration site (Texas Parks & Wildlife and Texas Department of Transportation, 1999-2000)

Nueces River - From the confluence with Nueces Bay in Nueces County upstream to Calallen Dam 1870 yards upstream of US 77/IH 37 in Nueces/San Patricio County (TNRCC classified stream segment 2101).

Biological function - Extensive freshwater and estuarine wetland habitat (Bauer et al., 1991)
High water quality/exceptional aquatic life/high aesthetic value - exceptional aquatic life use (TNRCC, 1996)
Threatened or endangered species/unique communities - diamondback terrapin (SOC) (B. Ortego, 1999, pers. comm.)

Nueces River - From the headwaters of Lake Corpus Christi in Live Oak County upstream to US 59 in Live Oak County (within TNRCC classified stream segment 2103).

Threatened or endangered species/unique communities - One of only four known remaining populations of the endemic golden orb (Howells, 1997 and Howells et al., 1997)

References

Bauer, J., R. Frye, B. Spain. 1991. A natural resource survey for proposed reservoir sites and selected stream segments in Texas. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Austin, Texas.

Howells, R.G. 1997. Distributional surveys of freshwater bivalves in Texas: progress report for 1996. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Management Data Series 144, Austin, Texas.

Howells, R.G., C.M. Mather, and J.A.M. Bergmann. 1997. Conservation status of selected freshwater mussels in Texas. Pages 117-127 in K.S. Cummings et al., editors. Conservation and management of freshwater mussels II: initiatives for the future. UMRCC Symposium, St. Louis, Missouri.

National Wetlands Inventory. 1999. National Wetlands Inventory maps for Texas. [http://www.nwi.fws.gov].

Ortego, B. 1999. Personal communication. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Victoria, Texas.

Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC). 1996. Texas surface water quality standards. Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, Texas.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Texas Department of Transportation. 1999-2000. The great Texas Coastal birding trail. 3 maps. Online. Available at http://www.tpwd.state.tx.ux/birdingtrails/index.htm

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. 2000. Annotated County Lists of Rare Species. Wildlife Diversity Program, Wildlife Division, Austin, Texas.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2000. Wetlands interactive mapper. National Wetlands Inventory, St. Petersburg, Florida. Online. Available at http://www.fws.gov/wetlands_interactive_mapper_tool.htm


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