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|  TPWD News Releases Dated 2006-04-03                                    |
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[ Note: This item is more than eight years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: Rob McCorkle, 830-866-3533, robert.mccorkle@tpwd.texas.gov ] [RM]
April 3, 2006
New Edition of Texas State Park Guide Available
AUSTIN, Texas -- With the publication of the 3rd edition of the Texas State Park Guide, Texans and others now have one less excuse not to get outside to enjoy spring weather and breathtaking scenery and learn about the state's colorful history.
An easy-to-use Table of Contents, centerfold Texas state park locator map and three-page grid detailing facilities and activities make planning your next outing to one of the more than 115 state parks and historic sites a breeze. Guide users can flip right to the kind of recreational activity that appeals to them, whether it be hiking, biking, horseback riding, fishing or just chilling out in a river or lake. Or open the booklet to page 12 and peruse the variety of overnight accommodations in state parks from lakeside cabins to mountain lodges.
A recently completed on-site survey of 11,000 state park visitors confirmed that the 112-page guide is one of the primary sources used to find out about more than 600,000 acres of public land, with 61 percent saying it had influenced their decision to visit a Texas state park or historic site. Some 43 percent of those surveyed indicated they had a Texas State Park Guide.
"The third edition is intended to be a ready-reference guide related to the entire state park system," said Walt Dabney, state parks director. "Texas is mostly privately owned, so if you like to go out and enjoy the outdoors, state parks are some of the primary places to do so."
Approximately 500,000 copies of the handy-sized booklet were printed by the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department and can be picked up free at any Texas state park, most TPWD law enforcement offices, the state's 12 Travel Information Centers and at various chambers of commerce and convention and visitor's bureaus. The guide is available, too, as a downloadable PDF file on the TPWD Web site in English and Spanish.
A new page, "Remember Texas," shines a spotlight on important legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps. It notes how many of the state parks' stone and log structures, bridges, dams and roadways built more than 70 years ago by the "CCC boys" endure even today as a fundamental component of the park system's infrastructure.
The booklet's State Park Directory, which is organized by the state's seven tourism regions, include vignettes about each park and historic site, as well as an address and telephone number. Symbols with each listing provide visual cues about the various facilities and activities to be found at a particular site.
The Texas State Park Guide also spells out the different types of state park user fees and special park passes, as well as details about how to reserve campsites, group shelters and other facilities.
Funds to underwrite the publishing of Texas State Park Guide were provided by Toyota through a sponsorship with the Texas Parks & Wildlife Foundation. This is the third year the automaker has provided funding to help make the guide available free to the public.
---
On the Net:
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/parkguide/
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[ Note: This item is more than eight years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: Tom Harvey, 512-389-4453, tom.harvey@tpwd.texas.gov ] [TH]
April 3, 2006
State Parks Advisory Committee To Seek Funding Options
AUSTIN, Texas -- A new Texas State Parks Advisory Committee* has been appointed to explore several issues facing the state park system. The committee will hold its first, organizational meeting from 1-4 p.m. April 13 at Texas Parks and Wildlife Department headquarters in Austin.
TPW Commission Chairman Joseph Fitzsimons appointed the committee and has asked for recommendations on four topics, including exploring funding options for the state park system. The committee is also charged with considering any existing units of the state park system that might be operated by more appropriate entities; the role of public-private partnerships in parks, including concessions, sponsorships and incentive based solutions; and options to accomplish goals for state and local parks in the Land and Water Resources Conservation and Recreation Plan, the 10-year operating plan for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
The new committee includes former state legislators and leaders of state agencies and conservation and tourism organizations. (See list below.)
"The formation of this committee has been in the works for many months; I deliberately chose a broad cross section of citizens, taking the time to speak with each one and hear their thoughts on the importance of our state parks," said Joseph Fitzsimons of San Antonio, TPW Commission chairman. "It is an impressive group of people with integrity, experience, a predilection for practical results and a demonstrated passion for state parks. However, those of us who love parks should by no means assume that all our problems will be solved because this group is now in place. A great state deserves great state parks, and it will take all Texans who care working together to achieve that goal."
The state park system began in 1923 when Gov. Pat Neff established the State Parks Board. It has since grown to a system of 114 sites representing important pieces of Texas's natural and cultural history. Each year, state parks attract an estimated 10 million visitors. Tourism is one of the largest components of the Texas economy and the state park system is a keystone element, generating more than $1.2 billion in economic benefits annually, mostly in rural Texas. This adds to the obvious value of inexpensive, nearby family oriented recreational activities and places to learn about the diverse history and landscape of Texas. **
Advisory committee members include:
--Al Henry of Houston. Human services consultant and owner of the East Fork Ranch in Tyler. An advisory director at Comerica Bank Texas. Member of the State Bar of Texas, the American Quarter House Association and the Smith County Farm Bureau. Past Vice-Chairman of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission.
--George Bristol of Austin. President, Texas Coalition for Conservation, an umbrella coalition of diverse groups formed to support funding for Texas parks; former member, National Parks Foundation; steering committee, Texas Farms & Ranch Lands Conservation Program.
--Ann Lents of Houston, President, Center for Houston's Future. President, Park People (Houston); President & CEO, Center for Houston's Future, and serves on the Committees of Scenic America and Houston Wilderness. Earlier in her career, Lents was a partner with Vinson & Elkins and practices law in the areas of antitrust, securities, and commercial trial law.
--Sandy McNab. San Antonio businessman, interested in historic resources. Past service to the Rock Art Foundation and Witte Museum in San Antonio.
--Carter Smith of San Antonio, Director, Nature Conservancy of Texas. Former TPWD staff member.
--Andrew Sansom, Executive Director, River Systems Institute at Texas State University in San Marcos. Former Executive Director, of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department; former Executive Director of Nature Conservancy of Texas.
--Clyde Alexander of San Antonio. Former State Representative from Athens, served on the Recreational Resources Committee.
--John Montford of San Antonio. Former State Senator who cosponsored legislation that dedicated a portion of the state sales tax attributed to sporting goods as a state park funding source, former Texas Tech Chancellor. Currently Senior Vice President for Western Region Legislative and Regional Affairs with AT&T.***
--Dianne Dies Schoch of Austin. Extensive fundraising experience with the University of Texas and Austin area nonprofits. Long involvement in East Texas conservation efforts.
--Brad Locker of Brownwood. Sporting goods manufacturer representative. Chair, Brown County Republican Party.
--Jeff Rogers of Dallas. Partner in Hampton/Rogers, a media relations and production company.
--Hector Gutierrez of Austin. Managing Director of HILLCO PARTNERS, he is responsible for all business development and assists with legislative strategies for this Austin lobbying firm. Gutierrez was a senior marketing and sales executive for SBC Corporation for 19 years and served as then-Lieutenant Governor Rick Perry's Senior Advisor for Legislative Affairs during the 1999 session.
--Paul Serff of Austin. President, Texas Travel Association, as well as President of the Texas Festivals and Events Association and Texas Nature Tourism Council. He is also a committee member of the Texas Industry Association of America (TIA) and serves on its Legislative Affairs Committee and as vice-chairman of the Tourism Works for America Committee.
--Beth McDonald of Austin. President, Texans for State Parks, a coalition of individuals and groups working to enhance the state park system.
--David Woodcock of College Station. Texas A&M University architecture professor with a history of involvement with Texas historic sites
--Ann Hamilton of Houston. Houston Endowment general manager
--Michael Massey of Richardson. City of Richardson parks and recreation director
* Correction, Aug. 1, 2006: The original version of this news release incorrectly referred to the group as a board. It is a committee. All references in the news release have been changed. (Return to corrected item.)
** Correction, Aug. 1, 2006: This paragraph has been edited to correctly describe the start of the state park system and its current number of sites. (Return to corrected item.)
*** Correction, Aug. 1, 2006: This item has been edited for accuracy. (Return to corrected item.)
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[ Note: This item is more than eight years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: Tom Harvey, 512-389-4453, tom.harvey@tpwd.texas.gov ] [TH]
April 3, 2006
State Parks Advisory Board To Seek Funding Options
AUSTIN, Texas -- A new Texas State Parks Advisory Board has been appointed to explore several issues facing the state park system. The board will hold its first, organizational meeting from 1-4 p.m. April 13 at Texas Parks and Wildlife Department headquarters in Austin.
TPW Commission Chairman Joseph Fitzsimons appointed the board and has asked for recommendations on four topics, including exploring funding options for the state park system. The board is also charged with considering any existing units of the state park system that might be operated by more appropriate entities; the role of public-private partnerships in parks, including concessions, sponsorships and incentive based solutions; and options to accomplish goals for state and local parks in the Land and Water Resources Conservation and Recreation Plan, the 10-year operating plan for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.
The new 14-member board includes former state legislators and leaders of state agencies and conservation and tourism organizations. (See list below.)
"The formation of this board has been in the works for many months; I deliberately chose a broad cross section of citizens, taking the time to speak with each one and hear their thoughts on the importance of our state parks," said Joseph Fitzsimons of San Antonio, TPW Commission chairman. "It is an impressive group of people with integrity, experience, a predilection for practical results and a demonstrated passion for state parks. However, those of us who love parks should by no means assume that all our problems will be solved because this group is now in place. A great state deserves great state parks, and it will take all Texans who care working together to achieve that goal."
The state park system began in 1907 with the establishment of the San Jacinto Battlefield site. It has since grown to a system of more than 115 sites representing important pieces of Texas's natural and cultural history. Each year, state parks attract an estimated 10 million visitors. Tourism is one of the largest components of the Texas economy and the state park system is a keystone element, generating more than $1.2 billion in economic benefits annually, mostly in rural Texas. This adds to the obvious value of inexpensive, nearby family oriented recreational activities and places to learn about the diverse history and landscape of Texas.
Advisory board members include:
--Al Henry of Houston. Human services consultant and owner of the East Fork Ranch in Tyler. An advisory director at Comerica Bank Texas. Member of the State Bar of Texas, the American Quarter House Association and the Smith County Farm Bureau. Past Vice-Chairman of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission.
--George Bristol of Austin. President, Texas Coalition for Conservation, an umbrella coalition of diverse groups formed to support funding for Texas parks; former member, National Parks Foundation; steering committee, Texas Farms & Ranch Lands Conservation Program.
--Ann Lents of Houston, President, Center for Houston's Future. President, Park People (Houston); President & CEO, Center for Houston's Future, and serves on the Boards of Scenic America and Houston Wilderness. Earlier in her career, Lents was a partner with Vinson & Elkins and practices law in the areas of antitrust, securities, and commercial trial law.
--Sandy McNab. San Antonio businessman, interested in historic resources. Past service to the Rock Art Foundation and Witte Museum in San Antonio.
--Carter Smith of San Antonio, Director, Nature Conservancy of Texas. Former TPWD staff member.
--Andrew Sansom, Executive Director, River Systems Institute at Texas State University in San Marcos. Former Executive Director, of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department; former Executive Director of Nature Conservancy of Texas.
--Clyde Alexander of San Antonio. Former State Representative from Athens, served on the Recreational Resources Committee.
--John Montford of Lubbock. Former State Senator who established the sporting goods tax as a state park funding source, former Texas Tech Chancellor. Currently Senior Vice President for Western Region Legislative and Regional Affairs with AT&T.*
--Dianne Dies Schoch of Austin. Extensive fundraising experience with the University of Texas and Austin area nonprofits. Long involvement in East Texas conservation efforts.
--Brad Locker of Brownwood. Sporting goods manufacturer representative. Chair, Brown County Republican Party.
--Jeff Rogers of Dallas. Partner in Hampton/Rogers, a media relations and production company.
--Hector Gutierrez of Austin. Managing Director of HILLCO PARTNERS, he is responsible for all business development and assists with legislative strategies for this Austin lobbying firm. Gutierrez was a senior marketing and sales executive for SBC Corporation for 19 years and served as then-Lieutenant Governor Rick Perry's Senior Advisor for Legislative Affairs during the 1999 session.
--Paul Serff of Austin. President, Texas Travel Association, as well as President of the Texas Festivals and Events Association and Texas Nature Tourism Council. He is also a board member of the Texas Industry Association of America (TIA) and serves on its Legislative Affairs Committee and as vice-chairman of the Tourism Works for America Committee.
--Beth McDonald of Austin. President, Texans for State Parks, a coalition of individuals and groups working to enhance the state park system.
* Correction, April 14, 2006: The original version of this news release incorrectly stated John Montford's title at AT&T. (Return to corrected item.)
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[ Note: This item is more than eight years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ General Media Contact: Business Hours, 512-389-4406 ] [AR]
April 3, 2006
Woodlands Angler Sets New Black Drum Records on Fly
PORT O'CONNER, Texas -- A fly fisherman from The Woodlands broke a 4-year-old black drum record here March 8. Stan Nabozny caught a 38.5-inch, 29.75 pound fish on a crab fly tied by Port O'Conner guide Tom Horbey.
"This is something we planned to do six months ago," said Nabozny. "We were trying to catch large drum with a fly rod last fall. They were big fish, but nothing like the fish this time of year."
Nabozny used a T -14 tungsten sinking line and the heavily weighted fly to get to the big fish, typically found this time of year in deep channels and passes.
Nabozny and Horbey timed their March trip to coincide with the beginning of an incoming tide.
"I was fishing in about 15 feet of water, trying to tease one of these drums onto the fly," Nabozny said. "I was just inching it very slowly across the bottom, and I got lucky."
Nabozny said it took him more than 30 minutes to bring the fish to the boat on his 12-weight fly rod.
The black drum actually qualifies for three records: the traditional state record for weight (fly fishing), a water body record for Matagorda Bay and the new catch and release length-only record for fly fishing.
The previous fly fishing record was 19.5 pounds, set in December of 2001 on the Lower Laguna Madre.
Joedy Gray, who runs the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department's Angler Recognition Program, said submissions for black drum records from fly fishermen are relatively rare.
"My first impression was that this is just a beautiful-looking fish," he said. "It's only the third black drum fly fishing submission I've had since I've been doing this program."
"That was the very first fish I hooked," Nabozny said. "I caught smaller fish, nothing that size. It was just an amazing fish."
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[ Note: This item is more than eight years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: Tom Harvey, 512-389-4453, tom.harvey@tpwd.texas.gov ] [MK]
April 3, 2006
Drought Affects Backyard Wildlife
AUSTIN, Texas -- Dry gardens. Wildfires. Low reservoirs. These are all examples of how the drought is affecting Texas this year. State wildlife biologists say there is something land managers and gardeners can do to offset the drought's impact.
"Water is a vital resource for all life, including our backyard visitors," says Matt Wagner, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department director of wildlife diversity. "If the drought continues, it will be important for homeowners across the state to maintain water features that wildlife are using in our backyards."
Not only will water be needed for ponds and birdbaths, but the plants animals use in gardens will be struggling as the drought continues. Wildscapes, or landscapes that are designed with wildlife in mind, and supplemental feeders will become increasingly important, since food for birds, butterflies and other animals depend on may be scarce from other natural sources.
"Nectar, seed and fruit production all require water," said Mark Klym, coordinator of TPWD's Texas Wildscapes program. "Leaves are composed heavily of water and stems serve to transport water through the plants. The Texas Department of Transportation recently stated that they do not expect a great wildflower display this year. This is typical of what will be happening with plants in the wild during droughts. The plants we use in our wildscapes are native, generally consuming less water than cultivated ornamentals, but they still require some water. These plants will also be important food and shelter sources this year."
For information on the Texas Wildscapes program, and other ways citizens can help birds, butterflies and wildlife in gardens, see the TPWD Web site.
---
On the Net:
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/wildscapes/
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[ Note: This item is more than eight years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: Tom Harvey, 512-389-4453, tom.harvey@tpwd.texas.gov ] [TH]
April 3, 2006
Coastal Expos Bring Beach to Cities
AUSTIN, Texas -- Texas Parks & Wildlife Department brings the coast to local communities this spring through Coastal Expo events in Edinburg, Victoria and Pasadena offering fun, family-oriented activities for all ages.
Coastal Expo events allow visitors to see and touch crabs, sea stars, and other coastal animals; view a glass-bottom stream; solve a mysterious fish kill; learn what washes up on the Texas coast; fish for live catfish; and participate in other great activities. In the process, they learn about Texas coastal ecosystems, why they are important, and how to protect them.
On April 3-4, the "All American City" of Edinburg and the Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center are partnering to bring Coastal Expo to the Lower Rio Grande Valley. More than 3,000 school children are expected to attend the two-day event. In addition, it will be open to the public for Family Night on April 3rd from 4-8 p. at the Edinburg Municipal Park. During this free family event, visitors can interact with crabs, fish, and other coastal animals while learning about freshwater inflows, coastal conservation issues and beach habitats.
"Coastal Expo is a great opportunity for people to explore the Texas coast for the first time, learn why coastal ecosystems are so important, and also what they as individuals can do to protect it," said Kris Shipman, TPWD coastal expo coordinator.
Activities include touch tanks with a wide variety of live coastal animals such as sea urchins, sea squirts, crabs, and other sea life. At the glass-bottom stream, visitors will learn about animals' natural habitats and how bugs can indicate pollution levels in water.
Participants will also have an opportunity to solve a mysterious fish kill, paint images of coastal fish, identify beach objects by touch, and learn about fishing, boating safety, and other coastal issues through a variety of fun and educational devices.
Exhibitors include: Edinburg Public Library, Edinburg Recycling Center, Edinburg Volunteer Fire Department, Frontera Audubon Society, McAllen's International Museum of Art & Science, Museum of South Texas History, Rio Grande Valley Chapter of Texas Master Naturalists, Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, Sea Turtle, Inc., Texas Master Gardeners, and Valley Nature Center.
On April 22 in Victoria, the Earth Day Celebration at the Texas State Zoo will include Coastal Expo activities.
On May 5 in Pasadena near Houston, the Galveston Bay Watershed Academic Partnership Youth Summit will also feature Coastal Expo activities.
Past and present Coastal Expo sponsors include Academy, Bealls, Buc Days in Corpus Christi, Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, City of Edinburg, H.E.B., Payne Volkswagen in Mission, Sam's Club, Valley Nature Center, Subway, World Birding Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Culligan, Wal-Mart and Texas Coastal Management Program.
For more information, see the Coastal Expo Web pages.
---
On the Net:
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/landwater/water/conservation/coastalexpo/
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[ Note: This item is more than eight years old. Please take the publication date into consideration for any date references. ]
[ Media Contact: Aaron Reed, 512-389-8046 ] [AR]
April 3, 2006
TPWD Game Warden Field Notes
The following are excerpts from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.
Game wardens continue border lake cleanup ... Wardens participating in the third wave of Operation Pescador seized 13,400 feet of illegal gill net on Falcon Lake. Wardens apprehended four violators and seized four boats and motors. Wardens have seized a total of 68,450 feet of gill net, 12 boats and motors, and have arrested 18 violators since the beginning of this operation.
Young waterfowlers jump the gun ... The Abilene office received a call about some young people hunting ducks illegally at Fort Phantom Lake March 15. A Taylor County game warden responded and located the suspects. One of them was almost 14 years old, and the other two were 11 and 12. The game warden educated the young men about places you can't hunt, open and closed seasons, hunting migratory birds with a pellet rifle and hunting license requirements. The grandmother of one of the young fellows offered to handle the situation, and the suspects were released to her.
Fishing felons ... A Harris County game warden checked three subjects fishing at Sheldon Reservoir March 12. Two of the subjects were found to be in possession of marijuana and a loaded .38-caliber pistol. A criminal history check on the two subjects came back that both had prior felony convictions. The third subject, who was driving, admitted he had more marijuana in his vehicle and gave consent to search. Warden Spitzer's search revealed a bag of marijuana along with 5 grams of cocaine, speed pills, a loaded .25-caliber pistol and an ASP baton. Felony cases are pending in county court.
Who's that fisherman? Two south Texas wardens worked a plain clothes detail on the South Padre Island jetties March 12. Eleven citations were filed for exceeding the daily bag limit of sheepshead, and 53 fish were seized.
If they'd been better shots, they would have gotten bigger fines ... On March 11 at approximately 10 a.m., a Pecos County game warden received a call from the sheriff's office in reference to a suspicious vehicle with blood running out of the bed of the truck. The game warden located the vehicle and made contact with the driver. Suspects first told the game warden that the blood was from a coyote. Further investigation revealed the driver and passenger had killed one white-tailed doe and one mule deer doe from the public road at approximately 2 a.m. The suspects, one juvenile and one 17-year-old admitted to shooting at approximately six deer during their excursion but had managed to kill only two. Several charges were filed as well as civil restitution.
Theoretically, that was a bad idea ... On March 6, two Van Zandt county game wardens wrapped-up an illegal alligator case almost two years in the making. The original tip came from a beautician at a nail salon who informed the fiancee of one of the wardens of a subject killing a five-foot alligator from a county road 21 months prior. After some extensive backtracking, wardens located the shooter, who immediately confessed to the crime. he shooter said he had shot the alligator, and then much to his dismay ran into a game warden the very next day. The shooter asked the warden about theoretically hunting alligators and was informed it was highly illegal to kill them. The shooter returned home and buried the alligator in a very deep grave with the bucket of a tractor. The case ended with the shooter and accompanying wardens digging up the alligator in a remote cow pasture with the same tractor. Multiple cases are pending.
Gotta run, Warden, but here's my parole officer's card ... On March 6, an Orange County game warden to check a vehicle parked along an isolated county road in Vidor. Upon making contact with the driver, a crack pipe and hypodermic needle fell onto the roadway. A scuffle ensued, and the suspect jumped into a nearby swamp and fled into the woods after being pepper sprayed. Fortunately, the driver left his driver's license and parole officer's card in his vehicle. Two hours later the suspect returned to his residence where the game warden placed him under arrest for multiple violations, including tampering with physical evidence, resisting arrest, and evading arrest or detention.
This boat was no party ... A game warden boarded a snapper fishing vessel returning from a state water fishing trip March 6. Twelve people were cited for no non-resident fishing license, 48 red snapper were seized $300 in revenue confiscated and $2,200 civil restitution assessed.
Game warden helps transport heart attack victim ... A Chambers County game warden was asked by the sheriff's office to assist in transporting EMS personnel to a camp house on the Trinity River that can be accessed by boat only March 2. An individual had suffered a heart attack and needed assistance. The subject was transported to the hospital and was listed in stable condition.
Don't poach in front of the game warden's home ... On March 1, two game wardens were returning from a public hearing in Carthage. Approximately one mile from one of the game warden's home, they observed a vehicle stopped in the middle of the road. Subjects were observed putting something in the back of the pickup truck. When the subjects were approached, they advised they were coon hunting but could not get the spotlight to work. Upon further investigation, it was found that both subjects did not have a hunting license, driver license, or insurance, and an open container of alcohol was in the vehicle.
Game warden rescues kayaker ... A Refugio County game warden received a call for assistance from the local sheriff's office Feb. 25. A kayaker had become lost on Copano Bay near Bayside. The kayaker had called from her cell phone and stated that she did not know where she was and that she was very cold and tired. The game warden launched his patrol boat and made contact with the kayaker and asked her to describe the surroundings. The game warden was able to determine her location and made his way toward her. The low tide forced the game warden to beach his boat on shore, and walk about half a mile through shoulder-high grass to the kayaker's location. The kayaker was very tired and shivering from the cold, and she was very grateful the game warden for his assistance and quick response.
Reckless immigration ... An Aransas County game warden was returning to Rockport from a meeting in Refugio Feb. 24 when he observed a vehicle being driven very erratically. The game warden activated his emergency lights and siren in an attempt to stop the vehicle. The vehicle continued into Rockport at high speed and moving all over the roadway. Two other game wardens as well as the Aransas County Sheriff's Department responded to assist the first game warden. The vehicle stopped at a residence and five male subjects ran to a nearby wooded area. The first game warden held nine other subjects in the vehicle while the other game wardens and sheriff's deputies located and apprehended the other five subjects. When the smoke cleared, the driver was charged with reckless driving and the other 13 subjects were turned over to the U.S. Border Patrol.
Shellfish violators keep wardens busy ... On February 20, two Harris County game wardens caught an oyster boat captain harvesting oysters in a prohibited area in Galveston Bay. Thirty-eight sacks of oysters were returned to the reef, and the captain was transported to the Chambers County Jail. Game wardens all along the coast have had a busy spring checking oyster boats and returning under-sized shellfish to local reefs.
Wardens rescue inadvertent bridge jumper ... On February 19, Bowie and Cass County game wardens responded to the county line for a wreck involving five vehicles and three pedestrians on the Sulphur River Bridge, which had iced over. The pedestrians jumped over the bridge to get out of the way of the oncoming wreck when one subject landed close to the river in a rocky area. It was believed she landed in the water, so the wardens were called out with their boat. The wardens located the subject and transported her in critical condition by boat to a waiting EMS unit. There were no fatalities in the accident.
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